Prevention & Education
Fire Department
Fire Chief

Contact:Kevin Shook

Phone:309-852-2115

Fax:309-856-6001


Escape Planning

How long do you have to escape from a fire in your home?
When people were asked this question in a recent survey, they answered in ways that surprised us. 58% said two minutes or more. 24% estimated they had more than 10 minutes to escape a home fire. The truth is, you may have much less time to escape. A typical living room fire can threaten the entire house in just a few minutes, producing life-threatening conditions in the upstairs less than two minutes after the smoke alarm sounds. Your family needs to know how to get out at the first sign of a fire.

Don’t wait, plan your escape today!

Print out your own escape grid plan. Then come back here for help in making your plan. Or draw your own floor plan on a piece of paper.

Mark two ways out of every room and include windows on your plan. Every member of your household should be part of the planning. Pick a meeting place outside. Tell everyone to meet there after they have escaped. That way you can count heads and tell the fire department if anyone is trapped inside.

Practice it!

Plans are great, but the only way to know if they work is to practice them. Hold a home fire drill. Getting out of your own home sounds easy, but your home can look very different if it is full of smoke. Children in particular need to practice what to do. Have someone press the button on the smoke alarm as the signal for the drill to start.

Remember that a fire drill is not a race. Get out quickly, but carefully. Everyone should go to the meeting place. Make time to plan and practice your family’s great escape today!

Survive Alive House          IMG_0932

This mobile trailer is designed to represent a common house. Firefighters take it to schools and general events to education the young and their families of proper procedures to escape from their homes once a fire starts. Firefighters emphasize the importance of smoke detectors and escape routes and practice them with the children. The trailer has the capability to practice 911 calls and will produce a harmless smoke to make a realistic scenario.

City Fire Department Statistics
Summary of fire and ambulance runs

Yearly Run Total for KAS and KFD

Year

Rescue

Fire

KAS

I-Intercepts

1995

948

268

795

*

1996

963

250

919

*

1997

1044

249

910

*

1998

1096

272

879

*

1999

1184

381

834

*

2000

1063

304

842

26

2001

1201

271

876

39

2002

1305

286

915

60

2003

1275

248

664

65

2004

1422

274

833

69

2005

1470

281

941

*

2006

1469

262

725

46

2007

1394

293

744

61

2008

1598

301

687

103

2009

1666

231

619

91

2010

1754

248

407

114

2011

1782

208

122

163

2012

1702

237

154

74

2013

1670

235

235

11

2014

1845

297

70

8

2015

2148

239

19

22

 

 

 

Juvenile Fire Starters Program

strikeout                            IMG_4680

The Kewanee Fire department started a juvenile fire setter program in 1999.The seriousness of the problem cannot be denied. Of all the FBI index crimes (the most serious felonies), arson has one of the highest rates of juvenile involvement. Of those arrested, more than 50 percent are age 17 and under. In fact, arson is the only crime where more minors are arrested than adults.

The A.L.E.R.T. program was designed to combat these statistics. A.L.E.R.T. stands for Arson Lowered by Education, Recognition and Treatment. In most cases a parent will contact the Fire station about a fire setting incident at home but sometimes a child will be recommended by a teacher or as a result of a fire.

The child is put through a program that involves an evaluation to determine the severity of the problem, Educational discussion and videos and follow-up visits. In some extreme cases a child can be recommended to more advanced help. In nine years , 100% of the kids that have gone through our program have gone on to normal lives with no fire setting activity.